Lest We Forget: The Fallen of Canada

By chance, I am at Westminster Abbey in London on Saturday, November 9th around noon, meeting some school friends.     We come across all the small cross memorials for the individual fallen service men and women from British, Commonwealth and Allied forces.   We follow the long line of people  and hear many languages spoken softly as everyone quietly absorbs the reality of loss of life and reads the names and messages on the crosses.   In particular, I look for the Fallen of Canada.

An open air service takes place and when it ends, I notice the number of young men and women wearing their service medals.  Overhearing snippets of conversation, I hear people remember their colleagues who died in service and how they will soon go and raise a glass in their honour and memory.

Words feel inadequate.   It’s a solemn and important occasion that touches the heart.

References:  Lest we forget   Phrase used in an 1897 poem by Rudyard Kipling called “Recessional”.

 

It’s a small world where wine and art connect: Bergerac wine region

Thinking about small worlds reminds me of the time my late mother met Long John Silver.

Mum had a great sense of fun and enjoyed every moment of this encounter.

It’s 1980 and we’re in Disneyland.   Aside from meeting Long John Silver and other characters, we go on the rides including the one where we all end up singing,  ‘It’s a small, small, small, small world’.

This is the refrain I remember every time I experience a small world story!

A small world story happened this summer, which seems like a long time ago now.    We had the opportunity to attend Masterpiece, the art event held in London in the grounds of the Royal Hospital Chelsea, the same area where the Chelsea Flower Show is held.

We heard about Masterpiece during a serendipitous visit to the Kallos Gallery in Mayfair on the recommendation of a friend, who knows of our interest in the classical history and mosaics of Cyprus.   The Kallos Gallery specializes in classical antiquities and is a supporter of archeological research.

We decide to visit Masterpiece and discover a treasure trove of paintings, antiques, jewellery, sculpture and much more.

We are interested to discover that the watchmaker and jeweller, Chopard, is   sponsoring the educational program at this event.   Interested not only to know that Chopard is supporting the learning and development of knowledge and appreciation of art for collectors at all levels but also to see that this approach is consistent with the ownership philosophy at Château Monestier La Tour in the Dordogne, where the family is engaged in organic wine making.    I wrote about my visit to Château Monestier La Tour earlier this year.  See:

https://elizabethsvines.com/2019/01/31/philosopher-watchmaker-winemaker-chateau-monestier-la-tour-monestier-bergerac-wine-region/

That Disneyland famous refrain about small worlds written by Robert B and Richard M Sherman for Walt Disney in the 1960’s never seems to go out of date!  It gave my mother a great deal of pleasure all those years ago in Disneyland.    I’ll hum the tune the next time I enjoy a glass of wine from Château Monestier La Tour in the Bergerac wine region.

References:

Walt Disney Music Company

Chopard    Chopard.com

Kallos Gallery   kallosgallery.com

Chateau Monestier La Tour, Dordogne, France.
chateaumonestierlatour.com

 

RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2019 …with Champagne!

Chelsea Flower Show!  This show in London is an annual and powerful magnet that attracts gardeners, garden designers and all the associated businesses and artisans.

Great excitement for me as I manage to buy an evening ticket to ‘Chelsea’, having almost given up on the possibility of going this year.  Tickets are like gold dust!    My preferred time slot is 5.30 pm to 8.00 pm, when it is cooler and less crowded around the popular gardens and exhibits.

Once in through the gates, I decide to focus on three gardens as well as the Great Pavilion and to treat myself to a glass of champagne!

First up is the Harmonious Garden of Life designed by French designer, Laurélie de la Salle.  This garden appeals to me for two reasons.  Laurélie uses her knowledge and experience to create environmentally friendly gardens.   Secondly, the gardens she designs are primarily in hot and dry areas where water conservation is important, which in turn influences her choice of plants and garden materials.  One small example is that instead of a traditional lawn, a clove meadow is featured which provides blooms for pollinators and enriches the soil as clover is rich in nitrogen.

Next on my list is the Campaign for Female Education (CAMFED)’s garden: Giving Girls in Africa a Space to Grow designed by Jilayne Rickards.  Created on a restricted budget, the garden demonstrates some techniques for gardening sustainability such as inexpensively constructed growing beds.  It particularly highlights the CAMFED focus on helping girls in rural Africa stay in education and teaching them sustainable agricultural techniques to help them and their families thrive.   All the plants grown provide food.  Apart from appreciating the goals of this garden, I really like the energy and vibrancy of the design and colours.

To mix it up a bit I then visit the Great Pavilion to get my Chelsea ‘fix’ of roses, hydrangeas and clematis.    I look at many of the exhibits and am always drawn to these dramatic, mood enhancing displays.   Who can resist walking among the roses:  it feels like walking into a parallel world of different fragrances, colours and textures.

Coming towards the end of my tour of the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) Chelsea this year,  I head to the champagne bar!

Fortnum and Mason of Piccadilly are the official supplier of champagne to the RHS Chelsea Flower Show.   I select a glass of their Brut Reserve, made by Louis Roederer, which is a blend of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier.    Also on offer is the Fortnum and Mason Rosé NV, made by Billecart Salmon, which is again the blend of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier but this time rosé.   Fortnum and Mason also offer a Blanc de Blancs which is 100% Chardonnay and made by Laurent Hostomme.

Happy with my champagne choice of Brut Reserve, I wander off to join the queue for my last but not least garden choice.

This is the RHS Back to Nature Garden, co-designed by The Duchess of Cambridge and landscape architects Davies White.  The brochure and accompanying plant list states that the objective of this garden is: “to highlight the benefits of the great outdoors on our physical and mental wellbeing and inspire children, families and communities to connect with and enjoy nature – which is core to the charitable work of the RHS (Royal Horticultural Society).”

I enjoy the stroll through this compact, choreographed garden.    The use of a winding path through the predominantly green landscape featuring fun places, like the wooden tent, the tree house and the great ball of string swing, provides that magical mix of adventure and calm that would interest the child in us all.

There are so many wonderful exhibits at ‘Chelsea’ and I appreciate all the hard work, time and effort put in by the many exhibitors.  Thousands of people come each day to the show, which is spread over 11 acres (4.45 ha). I am writing about a very small percentage of what can be seen and enjoyed there.

Experience has taught me that less is more when visiting such a magnificent flower show as ‘Chelsea’ and my feet thank me for this approach.   The experience is always enhanced by a glass of champagne!

References:     The Harmonious Garden of Life      Laulérie de la Salle

http://www.laureliedelasalle-paysages.com

CAMFED Giving Girls in Africa a Place to Grow     http://www.camfed.org  www.jilaynerickards.com

RHS Back to Nature Garden  www.davieswhite.co.uk

Fortnum & Mason   http://www.fortnumandmason.com

Royal Horticultural Society.  www.rhs.org.uk

Exploring London

Walking through Green Park in central London, between Piccadilly and the Mall – think Buckingham Palace – I discover an elegant, powerful yet somber memorial to Canadians and Newfoundlanders who fought alongside their British compatriots in the First and Second World Wars.

I’ve walked through Green Park many times over the years.   For whatever reason I have not discovered this memorial before made of Canadian Shields granite, water and bronze maple leaves.  It radiates a sense of calm underneath a canopy of horse chestnut trees.

The description of the memorial says:

Designed by Canadian sculptor, Pierre Grenache and unveiled by Her Majesty The Queen in 1994, this memorial pays tribute to the nearly one million Canadian and Newfoundland men and women who came to the United Kingdom to serve during the First and Second World Wars.  In particular it honours the more than 100,000 brave Canadians and Newfoundlanders who made the ultimate sacrifice for peace and freedom.

The monument, made of polished red granite from the Canadian Shield is inset with bronze maple leaves arranged in a windswept pattern.  Set at an incline.”

A quick catch up on Canadian history explains why the description differentiates between Canadians and Newfoundlanders.   Newfoundland joined the Canadian Federation in 1949, four years after the end of World War 11. As the description also states,  the military forces going to join the two world wars left from the port of Halifax in Newfoundland.

The easiest way to find this monument which hugs the ground, is to locate the Canada Gate, which is marked on London maps showing Green Park.  If you are facing Buckingham Palace, the Canada Gate is on your right towards Piccadilly.   The monument is ahead.

I find this memorial very moving, particularly as we approach the 75th anniversary of the Normandy Landings, centred around the date of invasion, 6 June,  known as D-Day.

Another opportunity to walk through Green Park presents itself when I stand in line outside Buckingham Palace to photograph the formal announcement of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s baby.    Lots of young people are queuing, excited to be in London outside the gates of the Palace and connecting in some way to Prince Harry and Megan’s baby.  On this particular day, it is a public holiday that day, so schools are out!

We take advantage of this time in London to catch up with some friends for lunch at one of the Côte Restaurants;  known for good value and convenient locations. The one we eat  at being near Trafalgar Square.    Imagine our delight at discovering a Bergerac Region wine on their list!    Needless to say this is what we order and all enjoy.    It is a classic Bergerac white wine blend made from mainly Sauvignon Blanc with Semillon grapes. Both varieties well established in South West France.   The refreshing acidity and citrus flavours makes this aromatic dry wine an excellent pairing with our fish entrée.  Château Laulerie, part of the Vignobles Dubard operation started in 1977, is situated in the Montravel area of the Bergerac Wine Region.  In London, this is competitively priced at an average price of £9 (15.37 C$ or 10.21 Euro).

One of the many things I enjoy about visiting London is the mix of culture,  history, food, wine, and events.   Always something to engage the spirit and imagination.

References:   Chateau Laulerie,   vignoblesdubard.com

Canada Memorial  – Green Park – The Royal Parks  www.royalparks.org.uk

The Art of Springtime Inspiration: Dinton Folly English Sparkling Wine

 

Whenever I am in London and have a few hours to spare, I do the things I love the most here: walking and looking at art. I am always uplifted and inspired by these experiences.

Yesterday, I walked in Green Park and captured this daffodil laden view of Buckingham Palace.

Daffodils are one of my favourite flowers.  Partly because they are cheerful, yellow harbingers of spring and partly because they bring back my childhood memories of playing in a spring garden at dusk, inhaling their lovely scent.  Seeing them in full bloom in Green Park surfaced all these connections.

For my art fix, I came across a magical small exhibition of mainly pastels with some oils by the Impressionist artist, Degas (18 34- 1917) at the National Gallery.  This collection on loan from Glasgow in Scotland, features Degas’s well-known subjects of ballerinas, racehorses and women attending to their toilette.   If only one could draw or paint movement as he did!

I have also been inspired recently hearing about a new vineyard in Buckinghamshire:  Dinton Wines, which was started in 2013.

Dinton Folly, an English sparkling wine, is the brainchild of retired countryman Laurie Kimber, who planted 15 acres with the classic varieties of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier on a south-facing slope with chalky soil and temperate climate.  The neighbours of Mr. Kimber, and his family including his children, grandchildren and even great grandchildren harvest the grapes.    The first harvest was ready in 2016.

Dinton Folly is so named because of its proximity to the ruins of a nearby castle and also refers to the idea of taking on such a challenging project later in life.     Dinton Wines is an inspiring testament to the fact that it’s never too late to start making wine!

Dinton in Buckinghamshire is close to the Chiltern Hills, a famous place for hiking in the English countryside with picturesque villages and friendly pubs!

Grape picking neighbours of Mr Kimber introduced me to this wine recently. I was delighted by the refreshing, dry, balanced, sparkling wine with its appealing lower range alcohol level of 11.5% ALC.

Perfect to enjoy on an English spring day:  Inspirational!

References

Dinton Wines       dintonwines.com

National Gallery:   Nationalgallery.org.uk

Maps courtesy of Dinton Wines and local tourist information.

 

Inspired by Chelsea Flower Show, sustained by champagne

I am inspired by the magnificent displays of flowers and plants at the Chelsea Flower Show this year in London and sustained by a memorable glass of Louis Roederer Brut champagne.

Not just roses catch my eye but hostas, dahlias, alliums and succulent plants all attract attention.   Thoughts turn to where I can squeeze in another plant in my garden;  what about that Restless Sea hosta?

We spend three plus hours at Chelsea, looking at the model gardens, enquiring about various plants in the Pavillion and admiring the garden sculptures in stone and wood.   Such creativity and talent on display.

We are impressed by the Royal Bank of Canada model garden, inspired by the Boreal forests of northern Canada.   RBC wins a gold again this year.

On a hot afternoon, a visit of several hours is the best way to enjoy Chelsea Flower Show in my view.   In previous years, I have attended for the whole day and my feet have not appreciated my efforts.

In the last half hour before closing, we find our way to the champagne tents where both Louis Roederer and Billecart Salmon champagne are on offer.  I enjoy both and have visited each of these champagne houses in France.  In 2014,   I wrote a series about champagne and associated visits, which are listed in my archives. Here are a couple of photos from the 2014 elizabethsvines archives:

Today, we choose the Louis Roederer Brut.   The classic, dry, biscuity, refreshing flavour with subtle bubbles is just what we need to celebrate another Chelsea visit.   I even forgot to take a photo…

 

 

Portfolio Tasting, London: something new, something remembered

I hear the buzz of conversation before I see the people.   Mid morning chat is at a gentle hum as people from across London and elsewhere greet each other and settle down to the serious business of a portfolio tasting courtesy of Davy’s Wine Merchants established in 1870.

Davy's Portfolio Tasting

Davy’s Portfolio Tasting

 

I have been thinking about historical context quite a bit recently, so I am distracted by considering the age of this business and thinking about what was going on when Davy’s Wine Merchants was established.   A time of upheaval and change in Europe with revolutions in the mid century and the unification of Italy a year later.   Queen Victoria was well established on the English throne and the Victorian writers: Trollope, Dickens, Elliot, Hardy were writing books that have become classics of English Literature.   I admire the skill and tenacity required to build and sustain a business over that length of time: 146 years.     Certainly, it speaks to the ongoing public interest in enjoying quality wines.

So back to the business at hand: sampling some of the wines presented by wine producers and/or the Davy’s Team.   It’s an impressive sight in the Hall of India and Pakistan at The Royal Over-Seas League house in St. James’s, London.   31 Tables with over 250 wines presented representing all the classic wine growing areas of the Old and New Worlds and developing wine growing areas such as England itself.

It would take a great deal of time to do justice to the large selection of wines at this tasting. After walking around the room and looking at all 31 tables, I resolve that the only way to take advantage of this opportunity is to be selective in my approach.

I taste a number of wines presented by Jean Becker from Alsace in France.   Their Pinot Gris 2013, soft, with peach fruit aromas; Gewürztraminer 2013, violets and very floral aromas, Riesling Vendanges Tardives Kronenbourg 2009, smooth, honeyed, acidic, and excellent for sweet and sour dishes.

I move on to Bodegas Miguel Merino Rioja, from Spain and really enjoyed the Miguel Merino Gran Reserva 2008, a beautiful rioja nose on the wine, smooth and long.

Vini Montauto, Maremma, Tuscany

Vini Montauto, Maremma, Tuscany

Italian wines from the organic wine producer, Azienda Agricola Montauto, in Maremma, Tuscany are something new and stand out wines for me. Their winemaking philosophy is to make wines that support food, not overpower it.     I particularly enjoyed their white wine: Montauto Vermentino Malvasia 2014.   There is considerable length to the wine, with deep and balanced fruit aromas.   At 13% alc./vol it is a very drinkable wine.  Vermentino and Malvasia are grape varieties typical of this area in Tuscany along with Trebbiano and Grechetto.   Sauvignon Blanc from neighbouring France has found a natural home in the area too. The Maremma area of Tuscany looks like an area worth visiting for its natural beauty, historical interest and microclimate supporting viticulture and the organic wines themselves.

As a final tasting experience, I can’t resist the Fine Wine Collection hosted by Davy’s staff and in this instance by wine consultant, Martin Everett MW.   I look at the line up of wines and notice that a Monbazillac AOC wine, a late harvest botrytized wine from the wider wine region of Bergerac is included; a Monbazillac Chateau Fonmourgues 2009.

Fine Wine Collection

Fine Wine Collection

The red wines at this Fine Wine Collection table are Bordeaux classics, both Left and Right Bank.

I focus on the right bank, Pomerol and St. Emilion.   Château du Tailhas, Pomerol 2012, located near Château Figeac, and Château Beau-Séjour Bécot, Grand Cru St. Emilion. 2006 – a special vintage- and taste these wines.

When I look at my notes, all I write is “ Beautiful”.

It says it all.

When I taste these top of class, prestigious Bordeaux wines with their full and satisfying flavours and aromas, I am always transported back to other occasions when I have enjoyed them.

On this occasion, I think back to 2009 and a visit to both Château Figeac and Château Beau-Séjour Bécot.   What struck me at the time was not just the quality of the wine but the accessibility and congeniality of the proprietors, in each case with family members at a multi-generational helm.   I remember at Château Figeac, Madame Manoncourt, the co-proprietor with her husband, rushed up to meet us as we were leaving. She had just driven back from Paris, a considerable distance, yet insisted on taking the time to welcome us to the Château.   In reading the history of Château Figeac, the Manoncourts were one of the first Châteaux owners many years ago to open their doors to general public or non trade visitors.   That sincere interest in the consumer is what good customer relations is all about.

Similarly, at Château Beau-Séjour Bécot, which we also visited in 2009, Monsieur Bécot joined us on our tour of the Château and the cellars and went to great lengths to explain their approach to making their wines.

It’s always the people who make the difference.

Peeling back the onion rings of memory, these experiences make me think of teenage visits to Bordeaux with my parents many, many years ago, when the proprietors always took the time to show us around yet the visits had to booked then by correspondence  some time in advance.   I remember at that time we visited Château Palmer and Château Margaux among others.

All these thoughts and memories come flooding back as a result of attending the Portfolio Tasting of Davy’s Wine Merchants, an organization with a long history and family lineage.

Enjoying wine, especially excellent wine, is always an evocative experience for me of other times, places and people.  It’s a time machine in a bottle.

 

 

References:

Davy’s Wine Merchants:    www.davy.co.uk

Domaine Jean Becker:    www.alsace-wine.net – Becker

Azienda Agricola Montauto:   http://www.montauto.org.

Bodegas Miguel Merino Rioja:   http://www.miguelmerino.com

Chateau Figeac:  www.figeac.com

Chateau Tailhas:  www.tailhas.com

Château Beau-Séjour Bécot:   http://www.beausejour-becot.com

Monbazillac: http://www.cave.chateau-monbazillac.com