Summer Wrap Up -wine, cocktails and crime fiction.

It’s a picture perfect, blue sky September day on the West Coast of Canada.

We’re in the ferry line-up returning from the Sunshine Coast to Horseshoe Bay, the ferry terminal on the North Shore of Vancouver. Schools are back and yet the ferries are a two-ferry wait unless you have a reservation, which we do fortunately.

The Sunshine Coast, aptly named for its sunnier climate, is a 40-minute ferry ride from Vancouver. It’s only accessible by ferry, boat or seaplane and is one of those places that support the province’s reputation as Beautiful British Columbia.

We visit friends here who make us Summer Pudding, the iconic late summer dessert with all the polyphenol-rich berries, including blackberries, blackcurrants, raspberries, and redcurrants.   Summer Delicious!

This summer we have tried two new BC wines: 2018 National Wine Awards of Canada gold medal winner, Averill Creek Pinot Noir from the Cowichan Valley on Vancouver Island and Liquidity Winery, Bistro and Gallery Pinot Gris from Okanagan Falls in the Okanagan Valley.     The choice of quality wines in British Columbia continues to expand. I believe there are now 280 wineries in B.C.   Who would have anticipated this 30 years ago?

Back home in Vancouver, we make a new summer cocktail, straight out of Donna Leon’s detective fiction novel: “Earthly Remains” set in Venice. The protagonist, Commissario Guido Brunetti creates a cocktail for his wife Paola from sparkling water, Campari and topped up with Prosecco.   We guess at the respective quantities by trial and error.    The resulting tall drink is definitely a popular and refreshing choice in the hot summer weather.

On the subject of crime fiction, Martin Walker, author of the popular Bruno Courrèges, Chief of Police series based in the Dordogne in SW France, was made an honourary member of the Confrérie du Raison D’Or de Sigoules at their annual event in July.  Police Chief Bruno, who enjoys good food and wine while solving local crimes, has a growing following in North America and has featured in my blog posts in the past, as has the Confrérie du Raison D’Or de Sigoules, of which I am delighted to be a member.

Finally, a comment about the Cherry Clafoutis I mentioned in my previous blog.   I made two: we ate one and froze the other. A reader asked me how the frozen one turned out when we finally served it. I am happy to report it was equally as good as the first one, maybe because it was carefully and purposefully thawed at room temperature over a couple of hours.

It’s been a tough late summer in British Columbia due to the number of wildfires. Fortunately,  with the arrival of autumnal weather, lower temperatures and even snow flurries in the north east of the province, the situation is much improved.   However, many people have been affected and our thoughts are with them.   Thanks and appreciation goes to the firefighters here in BC and to those who came from other parts of Canada, Mexico and Australia to help.

References:   Averill Creek winery: averillcreek.ca

Liquidity Winery, Bistro and Gallery, liquiditywines.com

Donna Leon, detective fiction writer of Commissario Brunetti series;    Donnaleon.net

Martin Walker, crime fiction writer of the series, Bruno, Chief of                                   Police.  www.brunochiefofpolice.com   Learn all about Bruno, his favourite music,  history etc.

and search for the following article in http://www.nytimes.com.

 

 

 

 

Bergerac Wine Region: cherries and wine

We are sitting outside in the warm early evening.  We hear music and talking coming from a nearby cherry tree.  First of all we think people working in the vineyard opposite have the radio on.  A little later that evening we are told that the music and chat show discussions are emanating from the radio placed in the tree as it is the only way to keep the starlings from robbing the tree of all its ripening fruit.    From then onwards we call this the singing cherry tree.

A couple of days later, we are rewarded for our patience in listening to heated debates coming from the heart of the tree with this box of ruby red cherries.

Dordogne cherries

Dordogne cherries

I decide this number of cherries calls for more than eating them as they are.  Making the French custard cake Clafoutisi seems an appropriate baking choice.

Cherry clafoutis

From the oven, Cherry clafoutis

I search the Internet for clafoutis recipes and choose the Allrecipes.com  recipe for Brandied Cherry Clafoutis   To date, I have made three; each one better than the last and all “successful”.  This particular recipe identifies canned cherries but I use fresh, pitted ones from the singing cherry tree. A couple of other variations based on ingredients on hand:  I marinate the cherries in Armagnac and instead of allspice use a mixture of nutmeg and ginger.

Cherry clafoutis

Cherry clafoutis

To verify that I am not straying too far from a French approach to making clafoutis, I consult a book from my late Mother, herself an accomplished cook:  Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Simone Beck, Louisette Bertholie and Julia Child. This Pengiun Handbook was published in 1961 and my Mother’s copy is dated November 22, 1966.

Here is what these ladies said about fruit flans or Clafoutis: ” The Clafouti (also spelled with a final ‘s’ in both singular and plural) which is traditional in the Limousin (region) during the cherry season is peasant cooking for family meals, and about as simple a dessert to make as you can imagine:  a pancake batter poured over fruit in a fireproof dish, then baked in the oven.  It looks like a tart, and is usually eaten warm”.

This baking choice looks better and better.

The Allrecipes.com recipe lists this general comment:  ” Clafouti is a traditional French dessert with brandied cherries baked with a custard topping creating a warm and sweet dessert that goes well with a cup of tea”.

This is where we part company as I see clafoutis as an ideal lunchtime dessert, served if appropriate for the occasion with a vin liquoreux.   A local choice would be a wine from the Bergerac wine region: a vin liquoreux which would be either a Monbazillac AOC or Saussignac AOC late harvest wine.

Vin Liquoreux, Saussignac AOC from Chateau Lestevenie

Vin Liquoreux, Saussignac AOC from Chateau Lestevenie

In this instance, I pair the Brandied Cherry Clafouti with a 2003 Chateau Lestevenie Saussignac AOC Vin Liquoreux.  Chateau Lestevenie is in Gageac Rouillac, one of the four communes permitted to make Saussignac AOC wines.  The fruit aromas and flavours together with the honeyed ripeness of this fully mature wine complements the cherry, vanilla, baked custard of the clafoutis.

Chateau Lestevenie

Vin Liquoreux: Chateau Lestevenie

To position both Monbazillac and Saussignac vins liquoreux in the wine lexicon, think broadly in Sauternes terms.   These are late harvest wines made from grapes affected by Botrytis cinerea or noble rot.  The predominantly Semillon grapes are picked late in the season when the grapes have been touched by the morning Autumn mists and the afternoon sunshine.   A major distinction between Saussignac vin liquoreux and other sweet wines, is that this is the only sweet wine produced in France that forbids the addition of sugar or “chaptalization” under its AOC rules.    It’s the Semillon grapes which allow the wine to age well.

Pairing cherries from the singing cherry tree and wine from a local winemaker is a way to celebrate the summer culture of SW France.

References:

allrecipes.com:  Brandied Cherry Clafouti

Mastering the Art of French Cooking: Simone Beck, Louisette Bertholie, Julia Child, Published by Penguin Books in 1966

Jancis Robinson; Oxford Companion to Wine re Monbazillac wine

Chateau Lestevenie wines: chateau-lestevenie.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bergerac Wine Region: SW France: Chateau Lestevenie: A Wine in Progress tasting

It’s a cold and bright, sunny day in the Dordogne;  cozy coat and sunglasses weather.  A great day to be outdoors!    Walking alongside the local vineyards I think about  a recent visit to Chateau Lestevenie in Monestier, a small country commune not far from Bergerac.

Chateau Lestevenie

Chateau Lestevenie

We were invited by Sue and Humphrey Temperley, the proprietors of Chateau Lestevenie to taste some of their wines in progress.    This means tasting wines in their incomplete state as the wines work their way through the fermentation and ageing process.  These tastings enable the wine-maker to make adjustments as the wines develop.   Regular tastings are also part of a larger regulated process of quality control in which wine samples must be sent for monthly laboratory analysis.

For us, a visit to Chateau Lestevenie is all about wine farming.   Perhaps it’s because Humphrey is an experienced farmer from the West Country of England who has brought his farming know-how and knowledge and understanding of chemistry to wine farming and wine making.  Maybe it’s because working the land and supporting the resident wildlife is an important aspect of Humphrey and Sue’s farming approach here.

Humphrey’s wine making philosophy is that he blends and makes wine for his own palate and yet appreciates the input of others to the process.  He says: “Making wine is a mixture of art and science.    It’s a bit like cooking – you have to keep tasting what you are making.”

We start with tasting their 2013 Bergerac White Sec, 100%  Sauvignon Blanc which has  finished the fermentation process and is cloudy from being on the lees (yeast).   It’s some time before it will be filtered and bottled.    Even in its unfinished state, the aromatic characteristics are evident and we can taste the future potential in this wine.

Bergerac White in process (before filtering)

Bergerac White (Sauvignon Blanc) in process (before filtering)

An intriguing aspect of tasting wines in progress is that we have the opportunity to see the large volume of dead yeast left from the fermentation process.  The Bergerac White Moelleux that we taste has just been moved from the fermentation tank.  The Moelleux is a sweeter Bergerac white wine which is predominantly Semillon, with some Muscadelle and Sauvignon Blanc.  Strict hygiene practices are followed and Humphrey is getting ready to clean out the inside of the tank.  He is going to wait until Sue is in the chai (winery) so there is someone there in case of emergency.   It can be dangerous work which involves getting inside the tank.

The inside of the fermentation tank after the white wine fermentation is complete.

The inside of the fermentation tank after the Moelleux white wine fermentation is complete.

Humphrey’s enthusiasm for wine making is catching.   As we stand in the chai, part of an old quarry,  our wine glasses are ready for each tasting.  We sniff, swirl and swallow/spit our way through this year’s production of white, rose and red wines, giving our impressions as we proceed.

The conversation soon turns to the wildlife on the farm.   After all, the hare is the symbol for Chateau Lestevenie.   Humphrey and Sue belong to an informal group called Wildlife Friendly Vineyards.   Part of their practices include the careful timing and minimal spraying of the vines so as to protect the insect pollinators – so essential to setting the fruit on the vines.    The surrounding woodlands of mainly oak and chestnut trees are also being managed to restore a mixed age tree population. A mixed age approach brings different height and breadth of trees which in turn allows more sunshine and nutrients resulting in healthier woodlands to support wildlife. 

The Hare at Chateau Lestevenie

The Hare at Chateau Lestevenie

The Dordogne is well known for the well established walks through the vineyards and countryside and  attracts many visitors.    Wine tourism is becoming increasingly popular in the region and wine tour companies bring visitors to Chateau Lestevenie to learn about wine making and enjoy a tasting.    Humphrey is a natural and knowledgeable educator and enjoys introducing visitors to the wine making process.

 Sue also writes an informative blog about the vineyard on their website.  Her post:  “Year in the vineyards at Chateau Lestevenie” gives a good overview of the calendar of wine making activities.

The focus here is on making good wine through skilful and eco-friendly wine production and farming practices.    An example is the 2010 Chateau Lestevenie Bergerac AOC Merlot Cabernet.   About a month ago, Humphrey asked us to taste this and our notes include the following:

“On the palate:  full, rich flavours, quite balanced, rounded, blackberry aromas, some spice and some vegetal.   Medium acidity, tannins and alcohol.   Good depth of flavours and body.   Some sharpness on the length/after taste which will most likely round out with more ageing.   Conclusion:  Ready to drink with decanting.  Will benefit from further ageing.   Good quality with lots of potential.   Similar to a Pécharmant AOC we had tasted recently.    Very good value.”

Chateau Lestevenie 2010 Bergerac Merlot Cabernet

Chateau Lestevenie 2010 Bergerac Merlot Cabernet

We tasted the 2010 Chateau Lestevenie Merlot Cabernet again this week.  Our view is that it is a very good wine with the depth and concentration that we appreciate in Bergerac wines.

The wine in progress tastings clearly benefit good wine making and we enjoyed the experience.

References:  Chateau Lestevenie:   wwwchateau-lestevenie.com

Wine Tours:     http://www.BergeracWineTours.com

The Colours of Rose – Bergerac Wine Region

IMG_3157 Vitrine du Pays Foyen – wine tourist office

IMG_3155Snowman – Le Bonhomme de Neige at Pineuilh, Ste Foy La Grande, Gironde, Aquitaine, SW France

This Snowman reminds me of a business trip to Quebec City years ago just before the Christmas holidays.    Amid the grey-brown foggy gloom of an eastern Canadian winter day, the Quebecois Bonhommes de Neige spread cheer wherever they appeared around the city and in all the Christmas decorations.   I’ll never forget them.

The cheerful chap in this photo comes from his french roots in France.  He can be spotted  towering over the new shopping centre in Pineuilh, outside Ste Foy La Grande in Gironde, SW France and almost opposite the new Pays Foyen tourist and wine shop with its tasting bar established right in the shopping centre.   That’s what the other photo is about:  the Vitrine du Pays Foyen meaning the window on the local area run by the regional tourist office to promote the area and is products.

More modern approaches to wine tourism are starting to catch on in the Bergerac wine region as increased competition forces wine makers to become more extravert in their ways.   This wine area “Vitrine” is a good start and many local winemakers from the Bergerac Wine Region;  from Monestier,  Sigoules and many other villages and communes are represented with photos of the winemakers and their products.   The different appellations that constitute the Bergerac Wine Region are:  Bergerac, Monbazillac, Montravel, Pecharmant, Rosette and Saussignac.

Chateau Lestevenie is one of the many chateaux represented at the “Vitrine” and it produces Bergerac ‘appellation controlle’ wines.   I particularly mention this winery from Monestier because their Rose is one of the best we have tasted and the colour is so festive – Merlot crimson I call it.    A wonderful cherry red to look at and taste!

Humphrey and Sue Temperley, the proprietors of Chateau Lestevenie make one Rose from old merlot vines and another Rose from younger merlot with some malbec.  Supporting our enthusiasm for their Rose,  the Chateau Lestevenie 2011 Rose won a coveted silver medal in the Vin de Bergerac Concours!.

Between the Bonhomme de Neige in Pineuilh and Chateau Lestevenie’s Rose,  its enough to put anyone in the festive mood.

Felicitations pour la Nouvelle Annee.

Reference:   Chateau Lestevenie    www.chateau-lestevenie.com

Office de Tourisme du Pays Foyen (the area between Saint-Emilion and Bergerac)       http://www.tourisme-dordogne-paysfoyen.com